Playing with tape, projectors, wool, Wikki Sticks and so much more!

We have been busy working with lots of different groups of children and young people at Thelma Hulbert Gallery, playing with tape, projectors, wool, Haribo sweets, and so much more.

05 Honiton Primary School

Children from Honiton Primary School popped in to join us for the afternoon last Tuesday. They were brilliantly engaged and fascinated by every aspect of the project. They all enjoyed role-playing a ‘rounding-up’ activity in the main gallery space. 9 children at a time took on the role of sheep while 3 became sheep dogs. They each ‘mapped’ their movements across the gallery floor using tape and wool as they followed the ‘farmer’ (either their teacher or Ellie our tireless helper) who pretended to be feeding them.

01 Honiton Primary School 02 Honiton Primary School 03 Honiton Primary School10 Honiton Primary School09 Honiton Primary School08 Honiton Primary School

As well as being a lot of fun and also helping the children get under the skin of the works in Flock Together, the resulting floor map was a real thing of beauty in itself – it was a shame to have to clear it all up at the end of the day!

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The children created collaborative drawings exploring the different qualities and possibilities of working from still and moving images and objects using video and OHP.

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They took turns in deciding and reinventing the composition and content of the drawing, with an awareness of others’ contributions.

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We were also delighted to be joined last week by students from the WESC Foundation, a specialist centre for visual impairment. What an exciting day, exploring ways of making tactile drawings and large-scale collaborative wall drawings.

20 School for the blind

We worked from simple line drawings on transparent acetate sheets transcribed directly from the video footage of sheep recorded on the farm.

21 School for the blind

The line drawings created bold and clear projected images, strongly visible to enable us to create a fantastic collaborative drawing using black marker pens.

22 School for the blind

We capitalised on the darkness of the gallery projection space, creating our drawings using the OHP while listening to the sound track of sheep and farmer sounds from the video – lots of farm atmosphere!

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We love the movement and expression in the collaborative drawing:

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Everyone worked brilliantly to create tactile drawings using materials including ‘German Film’ and embossing tools. ‘German Film’ is great stuff – as you draw it immediately creates a raised ‘blistered’ line – magic! Jordan tested them all out to see whether the tactile surfaces worked effectively to communicate and express the flocks of sheep.

23 School for the blind

Tape on the wall and tape on Jagos’ back! Tape is an excellent drawing medium for creating bold and bright tactile drawings quickly and spontaneously.

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And mix it up with Wikki Sticks (oh my goodness – we never knew these existed – they are amazing!!) – kind of coloured sticky string which adheres to pretty much any surface – and before you know it you’ve created another beautiful collaborative drawing inspired by Flock Together.

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And of course, we couldn’t resist capturing the sheep projected onto Jagos’s back as he was contributing to the collaborative wall drawing – he felt it’s shape through his sweatshirt as we traced it’s shape out on his back – magic!

25 School for the blind

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